Man’s Best Soap

My most recent column is about Lava soap. I give a humorous perspective on Lava, or “man soap” as I refer to it in my column. I had originally planned to do a blog post about Lava soap but came up with enough material that I decided to use it for a column.

It should come as no surprise that Lava is made by the same people as WD-40. Both products remove things and are popular with men who do a lot of work with their hands.

In my column I talk about how Lava is a “man” soap, but women can benefit from cleaning up with Lava too. Whether gardening, painting, or working on project that stains hands, Man soap does a good job at getting hands to come clean.

Lava is the disciplinarian on grease, oil, tar, paint, adhesives, grime, and caulks, but could also discipline kids if you wanted use Lava instead of regular soap to put in their mouth for those dirty little words.

Despite the fact that Lava claims to be “pumice powered,” it does not feel like a pumice stone but is rough enough to scrub off grime and stains.

Lava should definitely go on camping trips especially if you have a campfire. Cooking on an open fire makes a sooty mess on cookware and hands. Lava keeps your hands from looking like you’ve been living in the wild.

Lava is the kind of soap that fishermen and hunters should use after cleaning fish or dressing game but is also useful on ranches. We have it in our soap dish (most of the time) because it cleans hands stained from the mechanic work in the shop but also the manure, blood, and iodine stains from handling cattle or wrestling calves.

It does a great job of cleaning off dried-on bread dough, permanent inks, dyes, dirt that gets under fingernails and in the creases on hands.

I guarantee any man who works with his hands will appreciate having man soap in the soap dish instead of dainty soaps. He’ll come to the dinner table smelling like a man.

You can learn more about this man soap by visiting the Lava website. Hint: Lava also makes a great stocking stuffer.

Avatar of ranchwifeslant

About ranchwifeslant

Amy writes a humor column based on rural living and ranch life from the southern Black Hills of South Dakota. She and her husband raise their two kids on a fourth generation cow/calf operation near Pringle; the Elk Capital of South Dakota.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>